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U.S. soils devoted to grazing and agriculture are in critical condition as a result of long-term processes. Photo: U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

Climate change is threatening U.S. agriculture, writes Forbes

The magazine's examination: U.S. agriculture, as well as livestock, is reckoning with climate and drought. While soil health is of growing concern
By 2070, the Planet's soils are at risk of losing 40 percent of their biological crusts. Photo: USFWS Mountain-Prairie Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)USFWS Mountain-Prairie Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

The world may lose biological crusts due to climate change

Biological crusts are crucial to the survival of the soil and its ecosystem. But climate change now threatens to wipe them out, a study from Geological Survey has warned
Microbes play a key role in providing soil fertility. Photo: JThomas Creative Commons Attribution Share-alike license 2.0JThomas Creative Commons Attribution Share-alike license 2.0

Microbes provide a solution as fertilizers get too expensive

War in Ukraine and commodity boom pushes fertilizer prices to record highs: profiting from microbes' properties is a cost-effective solution as investors jump in, writes the Wall Street Journal.
In Iowa, Midwestern U.S., erosion is generating a decline in agricultural production. Photo: Phil Roeder Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)Phil Roeder Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

Erosion in U.S. worse-than-expected, new study says

Midwest fields have lost nearly 58 billion tons of soil in a150 years, University of Massachusetts survey says. Tillage effect, still ignored in government estimates, is crucial. Food production at risk
Traditional dance at the Navajo community in New Mexico, USA. Photo: Tolka Rover Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)Tolka Rover Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Traditional agriculture is good for soil and human health. A lesson from Navajo community

Traditional knowledge and modern science: how the Navajo community develops regenerative agriculture while promoting health and food security. A tale by the New Humanitarian
Urban forests grow faster and release less CO2 than their inland peers. Photo: Monika M. Wahi Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0)Monika M. Wahi Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0)

The paradox of urban forests: more polluted but even more useful for climate mitigation

Two Boston University studies show surprising results: forests grow faster in "dirty" areas on city borders. Where they store carbon more efficiently
According to a Chinese-British research, the low presence of some elements in the soil seems to be correlated to a higher mortality rate in Covid-19 cases. Photo: pxhere CC0 Public Domain Free for personal and commercial use No attribution requiredpxhere CC0 Public Domain Free for personal and commercial use No attribution required

Soil health and Covid-19 immune response could be linked, scientists say

A Chinese-British research identifies a statistical correlation between the concentration of zinc, iron, copper and selenium in soil and the outcome of Covid-19 cases: the lower the concentration, the higher the fatality rate. The investigation suggests a link between the two events. But further studies will be needed
Antibiotics used for livestock promote climate change as they impact on soil microbes. Photo: Alan Levine Free for personal and commercial use Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)Alan Levine Free for personal and commercial use Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

How livestock antibiotics affect microbes and promote climate change

Antibiotics and heat impact on microbes, accelerating their respiration andbCO2 emissions. Monensin, a widespread product used in animal breeding, is under fire.
The U.S. crop feed industry uses more than 100,000 tons of pesticides annually. Photo: U.S. Department of Agriculture Public Domain Mark 1.0 U.S. Department of Agriculture Public Domain Mark 1.0

The hidden cost of U.S. meat? 107K tons of pesticides, says The Independent

Negli Stati Uniti l’industria dei mangimi continua a fare ampio uso di pesticidi nelle colture di soia e grano per l’alimentazione animale. Nel mirino, rileva il quotidiano britannico, l’atrazina e il glifosato. Sostanze pericolose per l’uomo, gli animali e il suolo
The presence of hazardous chemicals in beef suggests previous soil contamination. Photo: Lance Cheung, U.S. Department of Agriculture Public Domain Mark 1.0Photo: Lance Cheung, U.S. Department of Agriculture Public Domain Mark 1.0

Chemicals in meat and soil raise concern in US, The Guardian writes

A contamination event in Michigan raises some alarm about dangerous chemicals infiltrating the soil and harming the food chain. US authorities' policy remains controversial, the British newspaper says.