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Nitrogen is used in agriculture as the basic element of many fertilizers. It is an essential factor for plant growth but also a potential source of pollution. Photo: Adrian S. Pye Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0)Adrian S. Pye Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Double-edged nitrogen is one more reason for a sustainable agriculture

How to manage nitrogen use to reduce environmental impact and protect soils. An Australian study provides guidance for firms and consumers
In the Amazon, large-scale agriculture is reducing rainfall volumes and fueling surface warming. Photo: Sam Beebe Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)Sam Beebe Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

Amazon agricultural boom is speeding up climate change

Researchers' alarm: large-scale cultivation in the Amazon causes a decrease in rainfall and an increase in temperatures.
The carbon great escape: Brazilian Amazon experienced a net loss of 670 million tons between 2010 and 2019. Photo: Neil Palmer/CIAT Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)Neil Palmer/CIAT Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Brazilian Amazon is releasing more carbon than it stores

Between 2010 and 2019, the Brazilian forest emitted 4.45 billion tons of carbon dioxide while absorbing only 3.78
Environmental DNA (eDNA) offers more clear benefits than traditional techniques for soil ecosystem analyse. Photo: U.S. Army, Jessica Vandrick Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0)U.S. Army, Jessica Vandrick Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0)

eDNA discloses the secrets of soil and helps us to protect it

eDNA enables scientists to extend their analyses of soil and ecosystems beyond the limits of traditional indicators
Seed and seedling production in the United States is still inadequate to meet reforestation goals. Photo: Lance Cheung, USDA public domain https://www.flickr.com/photos/usdagov/22021263075Lance Cheung, USDA public domain https://www.flickr.com/photos/usdagov/22021263075

Seed shortage puts American reforestation at risk

United States are suffering from seed, seedling and workers shortage. As a result, a study warns, reforestation plans are not achievable
glyphosate herbicide ogm insecticidePixabay

Glyphosate-treated soils say goodbye to invertebrates

A research from Mexico: the use of the controversial pesticide reduces the concentration of macroinvertebrates thus depriving the soil of their ecosystem services.
Microbes diversity in soil has a positive impact on carbon sequestration capacity. Photo: Alice Dohnalkova (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu) Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)Alice Dohnalkova (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu) Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)

Microbes, soil and CO2: diversity is better

According to a U.S. study, a healthy soil with a wider diversity of microbes is capable of capturing more CO2
In tropical forests, soil microbes play a key role in the carbon cycle. Photo: Melany Klapper CC0 Public Domain Free for commercial use. No attribution required.Melany Klapper CC0 Public Domain Free for commercial use. No attribution required.

How the vicious circle between soil, microbes and climate change works

Soil microbes react to global warming by emitting more CO2. A study in a tropical area shows alarming data

Goodbye phosphorus: how soil degradation is taking a key element away from agriculture

Swiss study: soil degradation accounts for 50% of agricultural phosphorus losses. With huge damage to crops. Global alert and uncertain future at the horizon
Adding rice husk to soil helps reduce arsenic and cadmium contamination in plants. Photo: WorldFish Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)WorldFish Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Rice husk residue provides a sustainable solution to contaminated plants and soils

Delaware University: the addition of rice husk prevents plant contamination thus protecting the health of billions of people