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In the 21st century, 90 percent of deforestation affected tropical forests, which lost 157 million hectares from 2000 to 2018. Photo: Kate Evans/CIFOR Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)Kate Evans/CIFOR Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Deforestation slows but global forests are still in danger

The results of the latest FAO survey: agriculture and livestock fuel forests destruction. Tropical regions are the epicenter of the problem. The protection of forested areas could save 3.6 billion tons of CO2 each year.
The Rio Plátano reserve, in the region of La Mosquitia, Honduras, is one of the areas most affected by deforestation as a result of narcos activities. Photo: Marc Patry Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO (CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO)Marc Patry Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO (CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO)

Here is how narcos are destroying Honduras’ forests

In Honduras, drug traffickers are still driving deforestation. The problem affects the whole Central America. However, it is not only drug trafficking that fuels land destruction, say indigenous communities.
In 2021 deforestation in the Amazon reached its highest level in 15 years. Photo: GRID-Arendal resources library, Riccardo Pravettoni Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)GRID-Arendal resources library, Riccardo Pravettoni Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Soya moratorium fails to curb Amazon destruction

Deforestation in the Amazon reaches new highs as soya crops can still indirectly cause it, pushing farmers to give up their land and look for new spaces in the region, says Greenpeace investigation
The biointensive method aims to maximize agricultural yields at a lower input of resources. Photo: Elina Mark Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0)Elina Mark Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0)

In Spain biointensive method proves successful as yields increase 81%

A study from Spain: Biointensive gardens experience higher yields, lower water consumption and increased carbon sequestration. Creating an effective solution to desertification
Cassava is a key component in the diets of hundreds of millions of people in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Photo: Tadekwiki Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0)Tadekwiki Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0)

Phosphorus and liming benefit cassava and ensure food security, researchers say

Actions to reduce soil acidity and increase phosphorus availability boost cassava crop yields, one of the basic food components for hundreds of millions of people
As pollinators, bees interact with over 90% of the native plants. Photo: Mauricio Mercadante Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)Mauricio Mercadante Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Brazil bets on bees through urban beehives and honey gardens

The government of the State of Paraná has decided to replicate the bee conservation project already developed in the capital Curitiba. An educational program that promotes the crucial role of these precious insects. 
In Africa, deforestation rates in areas managed by indigenous communities are lower than those recorded in protected areas under government control. Photo: maxpixel.net CC0 Public Domain Free for commercial use Link referral required https://www.maxpixel.net/Group-Women-Girls-Indigenous-Masai-Women-Maasai-6719908maxpixel.net CC0 Public Domain Free for commercial use Link referral required https://www.maxpixel.net/Group-Women-Girls-Indigenous-Masai-Women-Maasai-6719908

“Indigenous communities are the most effective shield against deforestation”

In native populations lands deforestation rates may be 26% lower compared to other areas, British researchers say. In Africa, they also perform better than protected areas.
Commodity companies are among the main contributors to Amazon deforestation. Photo: Charles Edward Miller Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Investment funds don’t leave Brazil despite Amazon deforestation, FT writes

According to the Financial Times, more than a year after the appeal against the Brazilian government, most of the major firms are still investing in companies linked to the deforestation of the Amazon
The Colombian capital Bogotá is home to several best circular practices promoted in Latin America. Photo: Felipe Ortega Grijalba Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0)Felipe Ortega Grijalba Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0)

Latin America is the new benchmark for urban agriculture and land care

From recycling to green building, from countering land consumption to urban gardens: here's how Latin America is becoming a leading player in the circular economy
Congo's forests are one of the largest global sinks of irrecoverable carbon. Photo: Marie Frechon. Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)Photo: Marie Frechon. Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

“Irrecoverable carbon released from forests is driving climate change”

The world stores at least 139 billion tons of carbon that once dispersed cannot be offset in time. Protection of endangered areas and indigenous communities is essential