Posts

More than 90 percent of deforestation in tropical areas is driven by agriculture. Photo: Kate Evans/CIFOR Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)Kate Evans/CIFOR Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Land speculation drives deforestation ‘for nothing’ in the tropics

In tropical regions, agriculture causes up to 99 percent of deforestation. But at least one-third of deforested land gives no contribution to food production, researchers have found
Pulp and paper sector is one of the major drivers of deforestation in Indonesia. Photo: Sofi Mardiah/CIFOR Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)Sofi Mardiah/CIFOR Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Banks’ support for deforestation grew since Paris Agreement

Since the Paris Agreement of 2015, three hundred corporations contributing to commodity-related deforestation have received $267 billion in funding, according to the NGOs coalition Forests & Finance. Amazon and Southeast Asia are the epicenters of this phenomenon
Worldwide, soy cultivation promotes the deforestation of 4,800 km2 of land every year. Photo: Hippopx public domain CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0)Hippopx public domain CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0)

Corporate commitments alone can’t stop soy-led deforestation

In 10 years, the moratorium on Brazilian soy derived from deforested land has saved just 2,300 km2 of forest, an international study says. "Supply chain governance should not be a substitute for state-led forest policies," researchers explain
In the 21st century, deforestation has erased nearly 10 million hectares of virgin forest in Indonesia. Photo: Peter Prokosch Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)Peter Prokosch Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Coal-to-biomass transition fuels deforestation in Indonesia

In Indonesia increasing deforestation would result in up to 489 million tons of additional emissions, the environmental think tank Trend Asia says. The figure dwarfs the CO2 savings expected with the partial replacement of coal with biomass
The Federal Supreme Court (Portuguese: Supremo Tribunal Federal) is Brazil's supreme court. It serves as both a court of appeal and a constitutional court, and its rulings are not subject to appeal. Photo: Rob Sinclair CC BY-SA 2.0Rob Sinclair CC BY-SA 2.0

Brazil Supreme Court restarts the Amazon rainforest Fund

Former President Bolsonaro had blocked it in 2019. The country's highest court ruled that the financial vehicle must be operational again within 60 days. After his reelection at the end of October, Lula will thus have at his disposal a fund with credits worth more than $20 billion
By betting on sectors involved in deforestation, financial operators risk huge losses. Photo: Preston Keres USDA CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain DedicationPhoto: Preston Keres USDA CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication

Financial damage from deforestation may be worse than 2008 downturn

Deforestation poses enormous risks for investors, says a UN research. By 2030, companies at the center of the global food supply system could lose up to 26 percent of their value
During Jair Bolsonaro's presidency, deforestation of the Amazon has accelerated. Photo: Isac Nóbrega/PR Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)Isac Nóbrega/PR Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

Brazilians choose their president and the fate of the Amazon forest as well

In Brazil the future of nearly 76 thousand sq. km. of the Amazon depends on the October 30 ballot, a study released by Carbon Brief states. That is the amount to the expected deforestation decline if former President Lula succeeds
The Madre de Dios region in the Peruvian Amazon hosts the community project supported by CESVI and Lavazza Foundation. Photo: Yoly Gutierrez/CIFOR Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)Yoly Gutierrez/CIFOR Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Amazon forest, a walnut can make a difference for local economy and climate change

Supported by CESVI and the Lavazza Foundation, Peruvian indigenous communities are finding in the Amazon nut a new opportunity for empowerment. With positive impacts on the economy and the climate
Protected areas in Brazil amount to 220 million hectares, or 51 percent of the Amazon. Extending protection over another 130 million hectares would cost no more than $2.8 billion a year. Photo: Andre Deak Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)Andre Deak Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

Protecting the Amazon would require minimal spending, a study says

In the Brazilian Amazon, costs per hectare of anti-deforestation policies are hundreds of times lower than in protected areas in Europe. But government commitment remains largely weak
Since the start of industrialization, England has lost 80% of its heathlands. Photo: Andrew Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)Andrew Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

England reckons with its history as biodiversity declines

England is one of the world's poorest countries in terms of natural variety, UK Environment Agency says. To counteract the historical fallout from early industrialization, a new land management approach is needed