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Soil is a complex system, say three British researchers. Today, a unified method for assessing its health still doesn't exist. Photo: Soil Science Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)Soil Science Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

British researchers propose a new theory of soil health

If we want to analyze soil health, we cannot rely on single indicators, says a new paper by Cranfield and Nottingham Universities. Instead, we need to focus on the relationships among the components of the system to get a complete picture. At the center of the new approach are four different dimensions
Protected areas in Brazil amount to 220 million hectares, or 51 percent of the Amazon. Extending protection over another 130 million hectares would cost no more than $2.8 billion a year. Photo: Andre Deak Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)Andre Deak Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

Protecting the Amazon would require minimal spending, a study says

In the Brazilian Amazon, costs per hectare of anti-deforestation policies are hundreds of times lower than in protected areas in Europe. But government commitment remains largely weak
Since the start of industrialization, England has lost 80% of its heathlands. Photo: Andrew Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)Andrew Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

England reckons with its history as biodiversity declines

England is one of the world's poorest countries in terms of natural variety, UK Environment Agency says. To counteract the historical fallout from early industrialization, a new land management approach is needed
A FAO study in Lesotho found erosion in 30 percent of the wetlands surveyed. Photo: Paramente Phamotse Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0)Paramente Phamotse Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Land degradation is threatening wetlands in Lesotho

About one-third of wetlands in Lesotho show soil degradation. A FAO-sponsored study releases first useful information to start restoration efforts
Fluorinated pesticides account for nearly 70 percent of all new pesticides introduced worldwide from 2015 to 2020. Photo: jetsandzeppelins Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)jetsandzeppelins Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

Flour-based pesticides hit the market as scientists are concerned

Fluorinated pesticides account for nearly 70 percent of all new pesticides introduced worldwide from 2015 to 2020, a research has found. But the environment struggles to deal with them. And their impact on human health is not negligible
Mangroves on Ubin Island, Singapore. The city-state wants to complete a massive reforestation campaign by 2030. Photo: Eustaquio Santimano Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)Eustaquio Santimano Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Singapore wants to plant one million trees by 2030

The project launched two years ago aims to restore Singapore's mangroves. The trees, which have been drastically reduced over the years, are a crucial resource for climate, biodiversity and soil
The strong growth of tourism in the Philippines is associated with the expansion of hotel construction and the demand for timber. Photo: André Héroux Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)Photo: André Héroux Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)

Booming tourism is fueling deforestation in the Philippines

The trend is associated with the expansion of construction of hotels and demand for timber. The repression toll is tragic as 29 environmental activists have been killed in 2020
The logging industry allegedly inspired the attempt to weaken anti-deforestation proposed rules in Europe. Photo: Hannes Knapp © European Wilderness Society CC BY-NC-ND 4.0Photo: Hannes Knapp © European Wilderness Society CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Europe takes one more step back on anti-deforestation rules

The EU chooses a weak definition of "degradation" in areas affected by deforestation. Scientists are worried, The Guardian says. This choice is a result of lobbying campaign by logging industry, Greenpeace remarks
By 2070, the Planet's soils are at risk of losing 40 percent of their biological crusts. Photo: USFWS Mountain-Prairie Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)USFWS Mountain-Prairie Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

The world may lose biological crusts due to climate change

Biological crusts are crucial to the survival of the soil and its ecosystem. But climate change now threatens to wipe them out, a study from Geological Survey has warned
During the 21st century, Nigeria has lost more than one million hectares of forest. Photo: Terry Sunderland/CIFOR Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)Terry Sunderland/CIFOR Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Fires and poverty fuel deforestation in Nigeria

From 2002 to 2021, the protected area in southwest Nigeria lost 45 percent of its primary forest. The burden of fires is crucial. Socioeconomic and demographic factors are driving the trend