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Soil organisms account for nearly a quarter of all living species and provide important ecosystem services. Photo: rawpixel CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedicationrawpixel CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication

Soil damage impacts underground wildlife longer

According to a British study, in soil subject to human impact the restoration is slower organisms living underground than in surface. New perspectives in research are needed to protect biodiversity
By consuming plant material, herbivores divert potential fuel from wildfires. Photo: World Wildlife CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain DedicationWorld Wildlife CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication

Herbivores are a surprising ally of climate and soil

Far from being destructive, herbivores contribute to climate change mitigation, according to a new research. Their ability to prevent wildfires and return carbon and seeds to the soil is crucial
Invertebrates, play key functions in soil balance. Photo: s shepherd Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0) s shepherd Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

Missing invertebrates: the UK has already lost a third of its earthworms

The biodiversity crisis is also affecting invertebrates. In the United Kingdom, says a study by the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO), the abundance of earthworms in the soil declined by 33 to 41 percent. Poor agricultural practices are a crucial determinant
Grazing may have negative effects in warmer arid areas with highly seasonal rainfall and lower biodiversity Photo: John Coppi, CSIRO Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)John Coppi, CSIRO Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)

Climate and biodiversity impact the effect of grazing on soil

Positive impacts of grazing on soil become negative as temperatures rise, an international research says. A more diversified vegetation presence helps offset the issue
Sustainable agriculture made a crucial contribution to the development of the Maya society. Photo: Diego Delso Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0)Diego Delso Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0)

Sustainable agriculture was crucial for ancient Maya’s society

Proper soil and agricultural management enabled the growth of settlements originating in southern Mexico in ancient times, environmental DNA study by U.S. researchers has found
Over two decades, trees in Finnish forests have promoted carbon sequestration in the soil with an average growth of 36 grams per square meter. Photo: Ajattokoj Ahyaj Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0)Ajattokoj Ahyaj Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Forests, climate and carbon storage: the lesson of Finnish trees

A 20-year survey by the Helsinki Ministry of Agriculture highlights the role of trees in promoting soil carbon storage. Logging reduces the amount retained. Some species prove more successful than others in sequestration
British forests are sequestering up to 8 tons of carbon per hectare per year. Photo: N Chadwick licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0)N Chadwick licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0)

UK researchers investigate carbon sequestration capacity in forests

British forests can contribute significantly to climate mitigation. A project aims to define the potential of agroforestry and open the way to a new market
The Congo River Basin is home to one-fifth of the world's plant and animal species. Photo: Corinne Staley Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0)Photo: Corinne Staley Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Deforestation in the Congo Basin is growing at an alarming rate

In 2021, deforestation in the Congo Basin increased by 4.9 percent affecting more than 630 thousand hectares of land. This is a particularly worrying trend, explains the Dutch NGO Climate Focus, when considering the area's importance for climate mitigation and biodiversity
Pulp and paper sector is one of the major drivers of deforestation in Indonesia. Photo: Sofi Mardiah/CIFOR Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)Sofi Mardiah/CIFOR Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Banks’ support for deforestation grew since Paris Agreement

Since the Paris Agreement of 2015, three hundred corporations contributing to commodity-related deforestation have received $267 billion in funding, according to the NGOs coalition Forests & Finance. Amazon and Southeast Asia are the epicenters of this phenomenon
Worldwide, soy cultivation promotes the deforestation of 4,800 km2 of land every year. Photo: Hippopx public domain CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0)Hippopx public domain CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0)

Corporate commitments alone can’t stop soy-led deforestation

In 10 years, the moratorium on Brazilian soy derived from deforested land has saved just 2,300 km2 of forest, an international study says. "Supply chain governance should not be a substitute for state-led forest policies," researchers explain