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During the 21st century, Nigeria has lost more than one million hectares of forest. Photo: Terry Sunderland/CIFOR Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)Terry Sunderland/CIFOR Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Fires and poverty fuel deforestation in Nigeria

From 2002 to 2021, the protected area in southwest Nigeria lost 45 percent of its primary forest. The burden of fires is crucial. Socioeconomic and demographic factors are driving the trend
Fish smoking and the resulting demand for firewood are a major driver of deforestation. Photo: T.K. Naliaka Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0)T.K. Naliaka Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0)

Smoked fish is driving deforestation up in Congo-Brazzaville

In the Republic of Congo, growing demand for firewood is fueling deforestation. After mangroves, alarm now extends to inland forests
Between 1980 and 2000, the world lost more than a third of its mangroves. Photo: Pat Josse CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain DedicationPat Josse CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication

Young Kenyans take care of the planet by restoring local mangroves

Mangroves are a valuable resource for climate mitigation and biodiversity protection. After losing a third of their stock in two decades, the world is called to regenerate these precious aquatic forests
A forest stretch in Kenya Photo: Ninara Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)Ninara Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

The power of community brings a Kenian forest back to life

Behind the rebirth of the Mirema forest is a community initiative that is now recognized as a best practice for the country. But also as a new sign of Africa's growing commitment to protecting its natural resources
Cassava is a key component in the diets of hundreds of millions of people in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Photo: Tadekwiki Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0)Tadekwiki Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0)

Phosphorus and liming benefit cassava and ensure food security, researchers say

Actions to reduce soil acidity and increase phosphorus availability boost cassava crop yields, one of the basic food components for hundreds of millions of people
A circular innovation for Africa: recycling coconut waste reduces timber consumption and deforestation. Photo: Freetown sl Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0)Freetown sl Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0)

The story of Alhaji, the startupper who is curbing deforestation with coconut waste

Una soluzione circolare contro la deforestazione in Africa Occidentale. Alhaji Siraj Bah, giovanissimo innovatore di Freetown, in Sierra Leone, scommette sui residui del cocco per offrire un’alternativa ai prodotti derivati dal legno
In Africa, deforestation rates in areas managed by indigenous communities are lower than those recorded in protected areas under government control. Photo: maxpixel.net CC0 Public Domain Free for commercial use Link referral required https://www.maxpixel.net/Group-Women-Girls-Indigenous-Masai-Women-Maasai-6719908maxpixel.net CC0 Public Domain Free for commercial use Link referral required https://www.maxpixel.net/Group-Women-Girls-Indigenous-Masai-Women-Maasai-6719908

“Indigenous communities are the most effective shield against deforestation”

In native populations lands deforestation rates may be 26% lower compared to other areas, British researchers say. In Africa, they also perform better than protected areas.
Great Green Wall of the Sahara and the Sahel Initiative

Africa, the Great Green Wall is an excellent economic investment too

A cost-benefit analysis of the Green Great Wall project in the Sahel has been published in Nature Sustainability. Every dollar invested produces an average return of $ 1.2, peaking as high as $ 4.4. Despite the harsh climatic conditions
Without new agricultural practices, the Yangambi territory in the Democratic Republic of Congo is at risk of increasing deforestation. Photo: Axel Fassio/CIFOR Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)Axel Fassio/CIFOR Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Climate smart practices can fix Congo’s agricultural crisis

Agricultural resilience strategies would be able to break the vicious cycle between global warming and deforestation that affects the lives of farmers in the African country. Here are the proposal of the researchers
Congo's forests are one of the largest global sinks of irrecoverable carbon. Photo: Marie Frechon. Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)Photo: Marie Frechon. Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

“Irrecoverable carbon released from forests is driving climate change”

The world stores at least 139 billion tons of carbon that once dispersed cannot be offset in time. Protection of endangered areas and indigenous communities is essential