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In China, the addition of biochar to agricultural soils has generally increased the organic carbon content of soil aggregates. Photo: Flickr Chris Farmland crops Changan Town China ATTRIBUTION-NONCOMMERCIAL 2.0 GENERIC CC BY-NC 2.0 DeedChris Farmland crops Changan Town China ATTRIBUTION-NONCOMMERCIAL 2.0 GENERIC CC BY-NC 2.0 Deed

Here is how biochar promotes the sequestration of organic carbon

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Biochar promotes the formation of soil aggregates and, with them, carbon sequestration, a research explains. In some Chinese farmland, the presence of the substance has increased by 60 per cent
The researchers' hope is that by predicting drought in advance, farmers and ranchers can better plan for water management. Photo: jackoscage CC BY 2.0 DEED Attribution 2.0 Genericjackoscage CC BY 2.0 DEED Attribution 2.0 Generic

NASA follows the light and anticipates flash droughts

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Space Agency researchers have found a correlation between flash drought and the intensity of induced fluorescence. A phenomenon related to photosynthesis and observable from space
The frequency and impact of wildfires have increased in recent decades, changing the organic and inorganic composition of the soil © European Union (photo by Pavel Koubek) CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 DEED Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic© European Union (photo by Pavel Koubek) CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 DEED Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic

Soil, wildfires and recovery: how much do we know?

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A U.S. study reviews current knowledge about wildfires and the resilience of ecosystems. Some factors can promote regeneration. Others end up impeding it
China's southern forests contribute to the accumulation of more than half of the organic carbon stored in the country's forest ecosystem. Photo: 揭英明 CC BY-SA 3.0 DEED Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 UnportedPhoto: 揭英明 CC BY-SA 3.0 DEED Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

How organic carbon accumulates in acidified forest soils

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A study by the Chinese Academy of Sciences reveals how forest soil acidification promotes both mineral protection and plant-derived carbon accumulation
Mountain meadows are one of the largest sinks of soil organic carbon in Central Europe. Photo: crash71100 CC0 1.0 DEED CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain DedicationPhoto: crash71100 CC0 1.0 DEED CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication

Mountain meadows are threatened by climate change

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Rising temperatures drives the loss of humus in mountain meadows and, with it, the release of CO2 into the atmosphere. This is reported in a study by the Technical University of Munich
Root decomposition promotes carbon release in the atmosphere. Photo: United States Department of Agriculture PDM 1.0 DEED Public Domain Mark 1.0 UniversalRoot decompoUnited States Department of Agriculture PDM 1.0 DEED Public Domain Mark 1.0 Universal

Roots and A.I. offer carbon storage solutions

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According to Alliance of Bioversity International deeper roots boost carbon sequestration while artificial intelligence enables more accurate measurements of carbon storage
The reviewed projects affect 3.4 million hectares of land in the interior drylands of Queensland, New South Wales and Western Australia where forest cover has increased by just 0.8 percent. Photo: John Robert McPherson CC BY-SA 4.0 DEED Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 InternationalJohn Robert McPherson CC BY-SA 4.0 DEED Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International

Forest regeneration in Australia does not influence CO2 sequestration

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A study shows that restoration projects implemented in Australia have had a negligible impact on tree cover. A finding that openly questions the effectiveness of the national carbon market
Microbes may be a viable solution to managing desertification. Photo: Richard Allaway CC BY 2.0 DEED Attribution 2.0 GenericPhoto: Richard Allaway CC BY 2.0 DEED Attribution 2.0 Generic

Microbes are a key resource for slowing desertification

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Chinese investigation shows how microbes play a relevant role in countering desertification through their ability to manage essential soil nutrients
Cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, have a high iron content and can be used to produce biological fertilizers. Photo: Josef Reischig CC BY-SA 3.0 DEED Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 UnportedJosef Reischig CC BY-SA 3.0 DEED Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Cyanobacteria are amazing biofertilizers for soil

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According to a U.S. study, cyanobacteria or "blue-green algae" can be used to produce a biofertilizer suitable for iron-poor soils, thus turning into a valuable natural resource for farmers
Degradation of peatlands generates 5% of anthropogenic emissions. Photo: Pixabay, Pixabay LicencePixabay, Pixabay Licence

Drainage channels in peatlands produce significant emissions

In Southeast Asian peatlands, man-made channels to drain soil contribute to carbon leakage into the atmosphere, research says